Desk Reset Video

Many of us work at a desk, or sit at meetings during work, but research published within the past 10 years clearly points to the association between prolonged sitting and increased health risks including diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Not to mention, it just makes us feel bad. When we sit for a long time, our joints stiffen and our metabolism tanks. The good news is that by breaking up long periods of sitting with activity, we can reduce these unhealthy effects. Try the 1-minute Desk Reset after an hour of sitting, and if you have more than a minute, get out and take a short walk or climb some stairs for even better results! Walking expends 150% more energy than sitting, and climbing stairs over 200% more! The more you move during the day, the better for your physical and mental health!

Obviously, this is just an example of one short simple sequence you can do right at your desk. Feel free to be creative, and make up your own desk reset! The main thing is to move, but here are some guidelines to help you create your custom Desk Reset:

  • Incorporate a few different movements, both upper body and lower body.
  • Choose movements that open/stretch the hips, shoulders, and chest.
  • Incorporate simple body weight exercises.
  • Incorporate stretching or your favorite yoga poses.
  • Keep it simple!

If you come up with an amazing desk reset that you’d like to share, send it our way at mtchallenge@montana.edu

“No Excuses, No Explanations.”

One of my favorite coaches, Tony Dungy, has a mantra: “No Excuses, No Explanations.” He even kept a sign of these words in his office as a visual reminder of his philosophy. If a player or another coach started in on why something wasn’t going the way it should, Tony would just cut him off and point to the sign. Tony wanted the focus to be on solutions, not obstacles. The following, our second “Share Your Wellness Story” offering, could be filed under “No Excuses, No Explanations.”  Coach Dungy would be proud. —NA

Many years ago when I decided to become a counselor, I had no idea how my life would change simply because I would sit in a chair for 8–10 hours a day.  I have always been an active person, so the change to inactivity was too much.  I felt my stress level increase proportionately to my waist size.

So I thought about ways to increase activity level in my day.  The easiest change was to increase the days I commuted to work on my bike.  That helped a lot.  Then winter hit and my activity level decreased.  So I did a bit of research and made my bike winter ready.  Since that time some 25 years ago, I’ve been commuting on bike year round.  In fact, I just put my studded tire on my bike today.  My commute is a little over 12 miles each day, which is about a half hour one way, a little more when there’s snow or when it is cold (single digits or less).

One other thing I was able to do because I work at a University where the gym is a quarter-mile away from my office, is workout over the lunch hour.  I love to play games and UM has racquetball and squash courts.  So I play at least three times a week, and then lift weights or do aerobic machines the other days. They do have a wonderful sauna, so there are the days (especially when it is cold) that I relax there.  It certainly keeps the stress level manageable.

So, sitting for so many hours isn’t so difficult because I get good exercise three times each day.

Mike F., UM Missoula

For more info on the dangers of prolonged sitting, check these webinars from MUS Wellness: